ABBATE INVENTING THE INTERNET PDF

Access options available:. Technology and Culture Janet Abbate's succinct but ambitious history of the origins of the Internet tracks this "protean technology" p. This technology, she argues, repeatedly moved in directions unanticipated and unintended by its developers. Nonetheless, it can be seen in retrospect to have been socially constructed by the values of those developers, as well as by its users.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Preview — Inventing the Internet by Janet Abbate. Inventing the Internet by Janet Abbate.

Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internet's design and use.

Since the late s the Internet has grown from a single experimental network serving a dozen sites in the United States to a network of networks linking millions of compu Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internet's design and use.

Since the late s the Internet has grown from a single experimental network serving a dozen sites in the United States to a network of networks linking millions of computers worldwide. In Inventing the Internet , Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internets design and use.

The story she unfolds is an often twisting tale of collaboration and conflict among a remarkable variety of players, including government and military agencies, computer scientists in academia and industry, graduate students, telecommunications companies, standards organizations, and network users.

It ends with the emergence of the Internet and its rapid and seemingly chaotic growth. Abbate looks at how academic and military influences and attitudes shaped both networks; how the usual lines between producer and user of a technology were crossed with interesting and unique results; and how later users invented their own very successful applications, such as electronic mail and the World Wide Web.

She concludes that such applications continue the trend of decentralized, user-driven development that has characterized the Internet's entire history and that the key to the Internet's success has been a commitment to flexibility and diversity, both in technical design and in organizational culture. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title.

Other Editions 4. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Inventing the Internet , please sign up. Be the first to ask a question about Inventing the Internet. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. Sort order. Start your review of Inventing the Internet. A well-researched and interesting read about how massive government funding combined with a series of coindicences resulted in perhaps the most influentual technology of my generation.

Aug 25, Katie rated it it was amazing. This was done both through technical choices such as layering and by making human beings, with their inherent adaptability, and integral part of the system. May 21, Nick Doty rated it really liked it. A history, of infrastructure and of people. Sep 19, rated it it was ok Shelves: nonfiction. Dry but detailed. Mar 05, Christopher Mitchell rated it really liked it.

A good introduction to the Internet's early roots with the right amount of technical discussion and the right amount of explanation for how things worked. Sep 03, Jack rated it really liked it Shelves: other-non-fiction. So, where did the internet come from? As I type this on my laptop on my couch, the question seems almost absurd -- like where does electricity come from.

But it turns out that's a pretty interesting story , too. So , Abbate covers a lot of ground in pages, from the very early days of the computer networking, to evolution of the world-wide web. What she does best is to make it possible to see the world prospectively -- to see it before we know who wins.

She does a great job of talking about pac So, where did the internet come from? She does a great job of talking about packet switching, and way in the early 's packet switching seemed like a potentially really mediocre idea. She recounts the kicking and screaming with which many of the greats of computer science were forced to join ARPAnet, and gives them a fair hearing. She reminds us that we built the internet largely to build the internet, and many of the initial reasons proved useless and unexpected reasons were why it is so useful to us today.

This ability to help understand history is remarkable, and a rare gift for a writer-- far too much history is really hagiography. She tells a good story. In contrast, her analysis of why some things happened to win is sometimes superficial, and her general observations are not that extensive.

So, she sums up: "The Internet community evolved several principles for reducing chaos and conflicts of interest in a decentralized and heterogeneous system. These included having multiple competing service providers wherever feasible; designing the system to maximize the number of operational decisions that could be made at the local level; and, in cases such as protocol standards where it is necessary to have a single decision-making group, having that group be inclusive and democratic.

Abbate has a deep faith in the power of decentralized groups of smart people working in good faith, and that is a faith I wish more people had. But the preceding paragraph is a verbatim quote of the vast majority of the high-level analysis of the book. This ain't sociology. If you want a book of "lessons from the Internet", rather than a news-like account of the growth of it, this is not the book for you.

But if you want to know the story and sort out some lessons for yourself, this is a fine read. Dec 21, Aaron Becker rated it really liked it Shelves: technology. Janet Abbate's Inventing the Internet contextualizes early developments in computer networking technology, allowing people who weren't there read: alive yet to understand what the earliest network users found in a system that was almost incomprehensibly primitive by today's standards.

Abbate points out, to the initial puzzlement of someone teethed in AOL chatrooms, that networking technology was never "destined" to be as indispensable as it is today. As part of a generation that views internet Janet Abbate's Inventing the Internet contextualizes early developments in computer networking technology, allowing people who weren't there read: alive yet to understand what the earliest network users found in a system that was almost incomprehensibly primitive by today's standards.

As part of a generation that views internet technology's simplicity as a given, learning the historical development of computer networking illuminated technical details and structural concepts of which I had only been vaguely aware. Contemporary standards appear so ubiquitous that the debates out of which they grew have faded into memory-- Abbate taps into those memories to reconstruct the intellectual environment that gave rise to the internet we now take for granted.

The only thing I found lacking in this book was a glossary of acronyms-- there are dozens of them, and keeping track of their meanings and connections often required a good deal of page turning. Feb 25, Jeffrey Hart rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction. The is the best book I have read about the early history of the Internet. Based on correspondence and interviews with the key people, Abbate provides clear answers to many of the questions that surround that history.

This book is a must read for anyone who wants to understand how we got here. Nov 25, Benjamin Malnor rated it really liked it. Janet Abbate does a great job explaining all the people and organizations involved with the creation of the internet. From networks to the computer programming Janet gives an all encompassing picture of factors that led to the creation of the internet. Feb 11, Lizzie rated it it was ok Shelves: learn-something-new , theme-history-of-the-internet.

Decent overview of how the Internet came to be. She does a good job of incorporating the social elements that also contributed to the invention, not just the technology advances. It was however fairly dry reading. There wasn't much exploration of any of the main characters.

Overall, if you want a quick book to explain things, this one isn't a bad starting point. This exquisitely researched social history guides its reader through a dizzying array of abbreviations and acronyms and will leave any one passionate about the Internet with a thorough understanding of the social, political, and economic history of its development.

Nov 22, Rahmad rated it really liked it. An easy and good history of how the Internet came to be. Jun 22, mcburton rated it really liked it Shelves: information-science , non-fiction , history. No one else has written a history of the Internet because this account is so thorough.

View 1 comment. Jan 13, Sridhar Jammalamadaka rated it it was amazing Shelves: technology. I loved this book. It narrates the history of internet. I read this for school. Not a fan. There are no discussion topics on this book yet. Readers also enjoyed.

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Janet Abbate's Inventing the Internet

Janet Abbate. We shop online, bank online, purchase airline tickets and make hotel reservations online, all at the click of a mouse through the World Wide Web, a graphical application for using the Internet. But how did the Internet get its start? In Inventing the Internet , Janet Abbate tells the tale of the creation and evolution of the Internet beginning in the late s with the development of a revolutionary concept for transferring data called packet switching developed simultaneously by Paul Baran of the Rand Corporation in the U. ARPA's challenges ranged from utilizing the new and unproven technique of packet switching to connecting a wide variety of incompatible computers to the fledgling network.

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This work is protected by copyright and may be linked to without seeking permission. Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically. Please contact mpub-help umich. Given the growing number of recent books that explore the Internet as a religious and spiritual terrain, such as Erik Davis' Techgnosis , it should not be surprising that the rhetoric surrounding digital technologies has begun transforming into mythology. Even generally measured business publications like The Economist can be caught recounting the activities and ventures of scientists, technologists, and digital entrepreneurs in biblical, epic, and heroic terms.

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Inventing the Internet

From Inside Technology. Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internet's design and use. Since the late s the Internet has grown from a single experimental network serving a dozen sites in the United States to a network of networks linking millions of computers worldwide. In Inventing the Internet , Janet Abbate recounts the key players and technologies that allowed the Internet to develop; but her main focus is always on the social and cultural factors that influenced the Internets design and use. The story she unfolds is an often twisting tale of collaboration and conflict among a remarkable variety of players, including government and military agencies, computer scientists in academia and industry, graduate students, telecommunications companies, standards organizations, and network users.

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